Disasters & Conflict Section

Members: 165

IAIA Section: Disasters and Conflict

Disasters such as war, famine, floods and cyclones, etc., can have severe impacts on the environment, including biodiversity and social structures. Recovery processes often have to be implemented quickly. Impact assessment tools are needed which can be applied to disaster management and recovery plans to ensure that environmental implications are taken into account. This Section enables IAIA members to share and disseminate information on disaster-issues and to participate in the development of sustainable disaster management strategies.

Co-chairs:  Charles Kelly and Annica Waleij

tags/keywords

Section disasters conflict

speaker iconAnnouncement

view all
dismiss

Webinar on disasters, conflicts and IA

Posted 3 days ago on Dec 9, 2019

Do you want to learn how disasters, conflict, and impact assessment are linked and why considering disasters and conflict (as well as relief and recovery) is critical to assessing impact? Join us on 19 December for a free one-hour webinar...

  • Group Announcements 1-10 of 126 results

    These announcements can be seen by anyone
  • Webinar on disasters, conflicts and IA NEW

    Dec 9, 2019 by Bridget John

    Do you want to learn how disasters, conflict, and impact assessment are linked and why considering disasters and conflict (as well as relief and recovery) is critical to assessing impact? Join us on 19 December for a free one-hour webinar presented by IAIA member, Charles Kelly. Click here for more information and to register.

  • Reminder - Disaster/Conflict Session Options

    Oct 29, 2019 by Charles Kelly

    Colleages,

    A reminder call for papers for the Disasters/Conflict Session:

    The Disasters/Conflict Section has been allocated a session at the Conference covering any topic related to disasters, conflict or crisis and impact assessment. The session provides agenda space for papers on the disasters, conflict or crisis and impact assessment nexus which may not be aligned with the conference theme.

    While any paper on this nexus will be consideredf for the session, we are particularly interested in papers which look at dams. The interest in dams has two focus areas:

    1. Tailings dam failures, as in Brazil and elsewhere. As engineered structures, tailings dams represent a technological hazard quite different from other hazards, such as chemical plants, usually grouped under this heading.
    2. Conflict-affecting dams, for example, the Mosul dam (flooding due to failure linked to structural issues), the Nuaimiyah Dam near Fallujah, where conflict led to upstream flooding and downstream cuts water supplies, and the contested Tishrin and Tabqa dams in Syria. Damage to dams and disruption of water supplied from dams during conflict can be considered a violation of the rules of war, overlapping a technological hazard with significant political issues which extend beyond the country where the dam is located.

    We welcome papers on other themes which can be included in the Disasters, Conflict and Crisis Section session at Seville 2020.

    Submission can be made through this link: https://conferences.iaia.org/2020/guidelines-and-policies-abstract.php. Submissions are open until 31 October 2019.

    Please feel free to share this announcment with others who might be interested in the disasters, conflict or crisis and impact assessment nexus.

    Please get back to me if there are any questions.

    Regards,

    C. Kelly

    Co-Chair, Disasters and Conflict Section

  • Last call for IAIA20 abstracts! Submissions close 31 October

    Oct 29, 2019 by Jennifer Howell

    IAIA20 paper and poster abstract submissions close at 11:59pm US CST on 31 October.

     

    The deadline is firm, so don't miss out-submit your abstract today!

     

    Check out IAIA20 proposed sessions to see what topics are available for paper presentations. With over 100 topics, there is something for everyone! Poster presentations are also invited and encouraged.

     

    The preliminary program and registration materials are also available online.

     

    IAIA20 will take place 26-29 May 2020 in Seville, Spain.

  • Awards Closing Soon! DEADLINE 16 SEPTEMBER!

    Sep 10, 2019 by Sue Quinn

    Anyone (that is you!) can provide names of companies, clients or colleagues for nomination via an online portal which can be accessed through Award Nominations.  There are only two categories in which the nominee has to be a member of IAIA.  The other awards can be given to non-members--virtually anyone! 

    The award recipients receive their illustrious award and will be recognized at IAIA20, held in Seville, Spain.  They will also be posted on our website throughout the year.

     Making a nomination is easy!  The seven awards with direct links to the nominations pages are:

    • Global Award  SUBMIT A NOMINATION   Presented to a leading individual or institution that has made a substantial contribution to impact assessment practice, management, or policy at a global scale.
    • Corporate Initiative Award SUBMIT A NOMINATION  Presented to a private or public sector company for a specific activity or project that has made a notable contribution to responsible development practice through the application of impact assessment.
    • Individual Award  SUBMIT A NOMINATION Acknowledges personal contributions to the discipline of impact assessment and recognizes major achievement and advancement in the theory and/or practice over a period of time at an international level.
    • Institutional Award SUBMIT A NOMINATION   Presented to a national or international organization for outstanding contribution to impact assessment, such as a significant contribution to the practice of impact assessment, setting regulatory standards, or other environment-related activity deserving recognition.
    • Lifetime Achievement Award SUBMIT A NOMINATION   Previously known as the Rose-Hulman Award. Awarded to a past or present member of IAIA for major contribution to the field of impact assessment over a sustained period. [Note:  IAIA membership is required.]
    • Regional Award SUBMIT A NOMINATION   Awarded to a person or organization that has made a substantial contribution to the field of impact assessment and/or has taken a leadership role in promoting best practice in impact assessment within the general world region of the location of the conference for the year.
    • *NEW* Youth Award SUBMIT A NOMINATION   Acknowledges a distinguished young IAIA member under the age of 35 with outstanding achievements in the impact assessment field. [Recipient must be an IAIA member.]

    Things to remember when submitting a nomination:

    The nomination can come from anyone!  You do not need to be an IAIA member to submit a nomination.

    Only the Lifetime Achievement and the Youth Award nominees have to be members of IAIA. 

    You can nominate anyone who has made a difference, a substantial contribution, or had outstanding achievements in impact assessment.

    Self-Nominations are not recommended.

    It is all done online so it is quick and easy.  (Award Nominations)

    It is an honor for IAIA to present these awards and recognize the hard work and diligent acts that are done each day to promote awareness and best practice in the field of impact assessment around the globe.  Please help us do this by nominating a person or an entity that you feel is dedicated to excellence in impact assessment.

     

    If you can't get a link to open, please copy paste this url into your browser:  https://www.iaia.org/awards.php

  • Disasters/Conflict Session/IAIA 2020/Call for Papers

    Sep 8, 2019 by Charles Kelly

    Colleages,

    As you may be aware, IAIA has opened submissions for IAIA 2020 Conference "Smartening impact assessment: Science, technology, and governance advancements toward efficiency and effectiveness" in Seville, Spain. This is the submission link: https://conferences.iaia.org/2020/guidelines-and-policies-abstract.php. Submissions are open until 31 October 2019.

    The Disasters/Conflict Section has been allocated a session at the Conference covering any topic related to disasters, conflict or crisis and impact assessment. The session provides agenda space for papers on the disasters, conflict or crisis and impact assessment nexus which may not be aligned with the conference theme.

    While any paper on this nexus will be consideredf for the session, we are particularly interested in papers which look at dams. The interest in dams has two focus areas:

    1. Tailings dam failures, as in Brazil and elsewhere. As engineered structures, tailings dams represent a technological hazard quite different from other hazards, such as chemical plants, usually grouped under this heading.
    2. Conflict-affecting dams, for example, the Mosul dam (flooding due to failure linked to structural issues), the Nuaimiyah Dam near Fallujah, where conflict led to upstream flooding and downstream cuts water supplies, and the contested Tishrin and Tabqa dams in Syria. Damage to dams and disruption of water supplied from dams during conflict can be considered a violation of the rules of war, overlapping a technological hazard with significant political issues which extend beyond the country where the dam is located.

    We welcome papers on other themes which can be included in the Disasters, Conflict and Crisis Section session at Seville 2020.

    Please feel free to share this announcment with others who might be interested in the disasters, conflict or crisis and impact assessment nexus.

    Please get back to me if there are any questions.

    Regards,

    C. Kelly

    Co-Chair, Disasters and Conflict Section

  • Environment and Humanitarian Action (EHA) Network

    Jun 30, 2019 by Charles Kelly

    Dear colleagues,

     

    The Environment and Humanitarian Action (EHA) Network was established in 2013 with the objective to promote collaboration on addressing the environmental impacts of humanitarian action. Specifically, the network seeks to maximize the outcomes of humanitarian action by avoiding, minimizing or mitigating environmental impacts and promoting environmentally responsible humanitarian programming. Network members aim to jointly advance humanitarian policy, strengthen knowledge on EHA, conduct joint advocacy and provide technical support to humanitarian operations.

     

    The Network is comprised of persons in their individual expert capacity as well as of organizations who institutionally have endorsed the Network and nominated an organizational focal point. Joining the Network does not come with an expectation of operational, financial or technical support, although members are expected to contribute to knowledge sharing and information exchange.

     

    The Network holds online meetings approximately every two to three months and one annual face-to-face meeting in connection with the Humanitarian Networks and Partnerships Week.

     

    To find out more about environment and humanitarian action, check out the Reliefweb environment page and the EHA Connect website. To find our more about the network, please consult the Terms of Reference. For specific questions, or in order to join the EHA Network, please contact the UN Environment / Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Joint Unit (ochaunep@un.org).

    Regards,

    Kelly

     

  • Just posted to Climate Change Resources: Deep Adaptation: A Map for Navigating Climate Tragedy (2018)

    Jun 25, 2019 by Weston Fisher

    A thoughtful examination of the likelihood of global societal collapse from climate change and the deterioration of other systems that support life, and how we might best respond to such a possible reality.  The author is Jem Bendell,a professor from University of Cumbria.  His conclusions have influenced the growing Extinction Rebellion movement.  

    He focuses on Deep Adaptation, the concept purporting that humanity needs to prepare for fundamental disruption of the global economy and society, with a likelihood of complete societal collapse. While climate change adaptation aims to adapt societies gradually to the effects of climate change, Deep Adaptation calls for acceptance of abrupt transformation of the environment as a consideration in planning for the future. decisions.

     

    Deep Adaptation: A Map for Navigating Climate Tragedy 

    IFLAS Occasional Paper 2 www.iflas.info

    July 27th 2018

    Professor Jem Bendell BA (Hons) PhD

     

  • Canada Declares Climate Change a National Emergency

    Jun 25, 2019 by Weston Fisher



    On Mon, Jun 17, 2019 at 9:47 PM Peter Croal <peter.croal@bell.net> wrote:
    Dear Friends, Canada has declared CC a national emergency...interesting times.
     
    And here is a good series on CC in Canada..
     
     
    Cheers,
     
    peter
     
    Please help us with Canada's Reconciliation efforts through Healing Forests. Want to create one? Please visit: https://www.nationalhealingforests.com/
     
    Peter Croal, P. Geol.
    International Environment and Development Advisor
    01-613-204-0787 (mobile)
    Skype: peter.croal_1
     
     
     
     
  • A key resource for IA practitioners on Climate Change Mitigation Law - Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the U.S

    Jun 25, 2019 by Weston Fisher

     

    https://www.eli.org/eli-press-books/legal-pathways-deep-decarbonization-united-states-summary-and-key-recommendations

     Home » Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States: Summary and Key Recommendations

    Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States: Summary and Key Recommendations

     

    Authors: 

     
    Michael B. Gerrard and John C. Dernbach, Editors
    Price: $12.95

    Release Date: 

     
    November 2018

    ISBN: 

     
    978-1-58576-195-1

    Pages: 

     
    160

    About

    This book contains key information and recommendations from a longer volume, Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States (forthcoming 2019). Legal Pathways is based on two reports by the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) that explain technical and policy pathways for reducing U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by at least 80% from 1990 levels by 2050. This 80x50 target and similarly aggressive carbon abatement goals are often referred to as deep decarbonization, distinguished because it requires systemic changes to the energy economy. Using these technical and policy pathways, Legal Pathways provides a legal playbook for deep decarbonization in the United States, identifying well over 1,000 legal options for enabling the United States to address one of the greatest problems facing this country and the rest of humanity.

    Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States: Summary and Key Recommendations grows out of a desire to get the main messages of the longer volume to the broadest possible audience. It provides thumbnail summaries of each of the 35 chapters from Legal Pathways. It also contains key recommendations from each chapter, the key plays available for deep decarbonization. Finally, an index organizes the key recommendations by actor (e.g., local governments), enabling readers to see in one place all of the key recommendations for any particular actor, regardless of the chapter in which they originated.

    While both the scale and complexity of deep decarbonization are enormous, this book has the same simple message as Legal Pathways: deep decarbonization is achievable in the United States using laws that exist or could be enacted. These legal tools can be employed with significant economic, social, environmental, and national security benefits.

     

    About the Author

    Michael B. Gerrard is the Andrew Sabin Professor of Professional Practice at Columbia Law School, where he teaches courses on environmental and energy law, and founded and directs the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law. He is also a member and former Chair of the Faculty of Columbia's Earth Institute. Since 1986, Professor Gerrard has written an environmental law column for the New York Law Journal. He is author or editor of 13 books, two of which were named Best Law Book of the Year by the Association of American Publishers: Environmental Law Practice Guide (12 volumes, 1992) and Brownfields Law and Practice (four volumes, 1998). 

    John C. Dernbach is the Commonwealth Professor of Environmental Law and Sustainability at Widener University Commonwealth Law School in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and Director of its Environmental Law and Sustainability Center. Professor Dernbach has written on sustainable development, climate change, and other topics in more than 50 articles for law reviews and peer-reviewed journals, and has authored, coauthored, or contributed chapters to more than 20 books.

     
  • Ground Breaking New Climate Change Law Enacted in New York State

    Jun 25, 2019 by Weston Fisher

    This article appeared in the New York Daily News on Sunday and was written by Michael Gerrard, Director of Columbia University's Center for Climage Change Law.  Michael is one of the most prominent and influential environmental attorney's in the U.S. The new law adopts many of the recommendations in the 1,200 compendium Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States, co-edited by Michael and published by the Environmental Law Institute in 2019.  The new law is likey to be a key model for other nations and states around the globe.  See https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-start-innovating-new-york-20190623-3mucksnuazak3axgpggpygxtly-story.html.  Michael has been one of IAIA's allies over many years.  I first heard him speak at IAIA 2005 in Boston.   

    The heat is on, New York: A new climate law is a major landmark, but now requires work and sacrifice

     
    They will have a future. (Theodore Parisienne/for New York Daily News)
     

    New York became an instant global leader in the fight against climate change with the passage last week of the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act.

    No other state and no large country has enacted a law with the essential ingredients to meet the temperature goals of the Paris Climate Agreement: a legally binding legislative act to achieve ​​an 85% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and a goal of net zero.

    Years of dogged work by environmental, environmental justice and labor advocates - some behind the scenes, some loudly in the streets - paid off. So did the persistence of Assemblyman Steve Englebright, Sen. Todd Kaminsky and Gov. Cuomo. It was a political triumph all around.

    The champagne corks are still popping. But the realization is dawning that implementing the new law will be really, really hard. New York is boldly going where no state has gone before. The goal can be accomplished, mostly with existing technology, but it will take a great deal of sweat and treasure (no one knows just how much), as well as a continuation of the political will that brought us to this point.

    In a perfect world, serious action to lower emissions would have begun in the late 1980s when scientists rang the first loud warning bells. That didn't happen. In a less perfect world, at least now we would have a Congress and a president willing to take serious action. Since we have neither, it is left to the states to act. California has long been the leader, but New York has now leapt into the front rank.Electricity

    The new law will affect every sector of the economy. The most straightforward is electricity. By 2040, all the power used in the state will have to come from clean sources - none at all from fossil fuels. The last two coal-fired power plants in the state are already scheduled to close, but there are quite a few natural-gas plants that still have many years of life in them.

    Someone will have to eat the cost of their early closure - whether it's investors, ratepayers or taxpayers. To replace them, there will be a massive program to build offshore wind facilities, solar farms and storage; the law requires enough of these to add up to the equivalent of 18 nuclear power plants.

     

    There will also need to be a great deal more onshore wind, rooftop solar, solar arrays and transmission lines. Fortunately the costs of wind farms, solar panels and energy storage have been plummeting worldwide, and their all-in costs (capital plus operating) are often below those of fossil plants.

    Not everyone will be thrilled to see wind turbines over the horizon from their beach homes in the Hamptons, or on top of their favorite mountains, or the transmission lines that will take the power to where it is needed. But a little bit of visual blight, if that's what it is - some people think wind turbines are beautiful - is nothing compared to the ugliness that will envelope the planet if we do not act decisively to move away from fossil fuels.A World War II-scale mobilization has often been called for to fight climate change; and during that war, no one was heard to object to the construction of an airplane or tank factory near their home.

    Electricity loads can be reduced by encouraging or mandating more energy efficient lighting (such as LEDs) and other equipment, but that will be more than overcome by the increased loads due to electrification of transportation and space heating and cooling. More on that in a minute.

    Transportation

    Only 17% of the state's greenhouse gas emissions is from making electricity. The largest portion, 33%, is transportation. Radically reducing that amount will require the conversion of almost the entire passenger vehicle fleet to electric. (Perhaps some cars will use hydrogen or other clean technologies.)

     

    This won't happen overnight. No one will be required to give up their current cars, though perhaps incentives will be provided, improving on 2009's federal cash-for-clunkers program. But increasingly, and in time entirely, new cars and SUVs will have to be electric.

    This will require federal cooperation, which hopefully will be available in a couple of years, because Washington sets national standards for vehicle emissions and fuel economy.

    But the state must set up the infrastructure to charge the electric vehicles that will have to replace internal combustion engines. Instead of going to gasoline stations, people will fill up their batteries at home, at work, in parking lots or garages or in charging stations on the road.Many buses and some trucks are already electric, and as batteries become cheaper and hold higher charges, they will run even the heaviest trucks. This will also mean an end to terribly unhealthy emissions from gasoline and diesel, and much quieter streets.

    For the vehicles that still use gasoline or diesel, the state may impose a low-carbon fuel standard that requires more of the fuel to come from biological sources, though care must be taken to ensure that this does not involve cutting down forests or reducing food supplies. Another possible energy source for heavy-duty vehicles is renewable natural gas from sources like food and agricultural waste.

    We also need to reduce vehicle miles traveled. The congestion-pricing law that will take effect in Manhattan south of 60th St. in early 2021 will help there. The state and cities can further reduce auto use through better mass transit, bicycle paths and transit-friendly land use patterns. Telecommuting will also contribute.Residential and commercial

    Residential and commercial uses add up to 26% of state greenhouse gas emissions. Most of this is from heating and cooling buildings; heating water; and cooking, mostly by natural gas and oil. This will be reduced mostly by retrofitting millions of buildings to make them more energy efficient.

    Improvements to insulation, windows, HVAC systems, and other elements can greatly reduce buildings' energy load. Old inefficient appliances will need to be replaced with new ones. Many buildings will need to have their heating and cooling converted to electricity and heat pumps.

     

    This is another huge lift. Keeping homes from Buffalo to Brooklyn warm in the dead of winter without using gas or oil will take an enormous amount of new electrical capacity. Delivering it, especially on days when the sun isn't shining or the wind isn't blowing very hard, is going to be a massive challenge.

    Converting fossil-fuel-based heating systems to clean electrical ones costs a lot of money. That will require additional subsidies (some already exist) from governments or utilities - especially for the housing for the less affluent, and for small businesses. New York City got a jump start in April on these building efficiency improvements when the City Council passed a law requiring emissions reductions from large buildings.

    Jobs

     

    The economic costs are real; so are the opportunities.

    Just retrofitting buildings in the New York City area has the potential to create 126,000 jobs by 2030 - architects, engineers, sustainability consultants, building tradespeople, HVAC professionals - according to Prof. David Hsu of MIT. (This is three to five five times as many jobs as Amazon would have brought to New York.) This will require massive job training programs to provide New Yorkers with the necessary skills.

    Inevitably, some jobs will also be lost in the bargain; we can't pretend otherwise. The law has detailed provisions for helping out workers displaced by the transition away from fossil fuels, and also for assisting those communities that have been disproportionately affected by pollution.

     

    Reality

    Even as we marshal all our creativity and resources to transform our energy economy, some emissions will be completely beyond the power of the state to reduce. New York cannot bar out-of-state cars or trucks from coming into or passing through the state. New York has no control over airplanes, which are highly emitting.

    Some industrial operations, such as cement and aluminum production, rely on processes that emit large quantities of carbon dioxide that are very difficult to control.

     

    Some earlier bills had required absolute zero emissions, but that is not possible. Instead the final law allows up to 15% of statewide emissions to remain. Companies that still emit must entirely offset their greenhouse gases, mostly through natural methods that are subject to elaborate restrictions that may be difficult to meet.

    The law gives state agencies the power to accomplish much of this, but it does not tell them just how to do it. It's left to various committees to figure that out. As these committees are formed and the magnitude of the financial opportunities for some sectors and perils to others become clear, enormous pressures will be brought to bear to secure outcomes favorable to various groups; lobbyists will be among the first to enjoy an employment boom.

    Our leaders will need to display the backbone to make sure the ultimate objective of net-zero emissions is achieved.

     

    The costs of all of this will be very high. But one thing is clear: the costs of not acting, and allowing the seas and the temperatures to rise up without restraint, would eventually be far greater. Our grandchildren will not forgive us for imposing these costs on them rather than taking responsibility for the costs of our own pollution.

    The world will be watching, and the reverse of the old adage will apply: if it can't be done in New York, it can't be done anywhere. New York already has the country's most efficient transportation system (thanks to our subways, buses and commuter rail) and building stock (thanks to our density). We're a state rich in money, brains and moxie. Let's do this.

    Gerrard is a professor and director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School.




Copyright © 2019 IAIA. All rights reserved. | Powered by MemberFuse ⑯ View Mobile Site